Thank you to the OAC & CCftA

Storytelling

Alan works as a solo-artist in theatre. He uses a non-traditional development method, called Performance Creation, to produce original one-act plays. Alan is inspired by the conventions arising from the global disability arts and culture movement. This movement advances a cultural practice where artists represent their lived experience of disability as complex, dynamic, and infused with a range of concerns that include hopes and dreams, self-worth and autonomy, sexuality and relationships, and social barriers to disability. Alan’s shows therefore focus on shaping a rich and authentic human connection between a physically disabled character and abled-bodied audiences.

Alan’s plays reveal a new cultural consciousness, one that stretches dominant narratives of disability. He encourages audiences to identify and resonate with his disabled character – to really see and know him, from his own perspective, rather than from theirs. In response, Alan asks audiences to see and know themselves – especially the ways that we unintentionally shape and support negative attitudes about disabled people. Alan confronts audiences about these stereotypes, and uses humor to make it possible for us to laugh at the situations he’s challenged by. While laughing together, both actor and audience get to discover just what it is that stops us all from genuine personal and social interaction with disabled people.

THE SHOWS:

Still Waiting for that Special Bus
Still Waiting for that Special Bus
Time to Put My Socks On
Time to Put My Socks On

TRAINING

Alan mixes traditional and non-traditional development methods to create original solo productions which explore the lived experience of disability. His training and practice is inspired by the conventions arising from the global disability arts and culture movement. This movement advances a cultural practice where artists represent their lived experience of disability as complex, dynamic, and infused with a range of concerns that include hopes and dreams, self-worth and autonomy, sexuality and relationships, and social barriers to disability. Alan’s work therefore focuses on shaping a rich and authentic human connection between a physically disabled character and able-bodied audiences.

Alan’s plays reveal a new cultural consciousness, one that stretches dominant narratives of disability. He encourages audiences to identify and resonate with his disabled character – to really see and know him, from his own perspective, rather than from theirs. In response, Alan asks audiences to see and know themselves – especially the ways that we unintentionally shape and support negative attitudes about disabled people. Humour is used to challenge audiences around these stereotypes in ways which make it possible for us all to laugh with Alan. While laughing together, both actor and audience discover a "window of change" which opens genuine personal and social interaction with disabled people.

Alan’s approach to acting has necessarily included the development of voice and movement vocabulary that integrates and – more importantly – builds from a physically disabled body. Alan therefore explores new modes of performance that are generated by a different relationship to time and space, to presence and staging, and to dialogue and delivery. His theatre training includes instruction in traditional acting methods, voice technique, movement for actors, improvisation, and Theatre of the Oppressed methods. He continues to expand and develop his performance techniques and has trained with Trevor John Studios, Ottawa Little Theatre, Pierre Huot, Fides Studios, Miriam Rother, Peter Ryan (Prima Materia), Stage-Left Productions – to name a few.

 

 

 

 

Shain

holds

the stage

with

consummate

ease

 

robert crew

TORONTO STAR